VW Camper Family

A camping forum for VW bus and camper owners.

Hi everyone when camping with kids there are many times when we need to entertain the kiddies.  Here's a spot where we can add ideas to make our lives easier so we also enjoy camping.

Please add your own ideas

Here's a cool link to print off VW Coloring Book.  Just click on bus, Click to Zoom and print the ones you want.  I was a little disappointed that no bays are included. Oh well still cool and will entertain the kiddies.

http://www.justkampers.com/uploads/multimedia/ebooks/Colouring_Book...


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Cut and glue vw Bus Craft for kids.

Make bigger, Print off have fun!

see attached file
Attachments:
Westy Ornament
print, Cut and paste
Attachments:
There are additional cut and paste VW bus models in the "files" section of the Westfalia Yahoo! group.

http://www.tinyurl.com/westy
I have had to rebuild my engine so i have not gone camping as much as i would like to my 4 year old is dying to get out and have some fun .engines in now just gotta figure out this dang california emmissions hose nest i will be back on the road.
TO GREAT DRIVING. IRONPAW.
Stuff to Make:
* Journals
* Make a map of the area
* Take pictures
o Bring a disposable for each person
o Digital cameras
* Make a video
* Glue, markers, tape and paper to make collages
* Clay to make sculptures
* Crayons and paper to make rubbings
* Clay or dough to make pressings
* Spore prints
* Collection of many many great crafty ideas in and about nature from Crafty Crow
* Plaster of paris tracks
* Play binoculars out of toilet paper rolls

To do:
# Shadow puppets. Here is a great activity from GiversLog that could be adapted for inside the tent
# Flashlight tag
# Games-

* Sports games: badmitton (with or without the net), paddle ball, horseshoes
* Board games: Scrabble, Boggle, Pass the Pigs, Jacks (travel versions are great for camping)

# Great game bag you can make seen here and originally blogged here
# Fun games and outdoor gear to buy
# Find your tree: one person is blindfolded, spun around and lead to a tree (within eyesite of the starting point) and told “this is your tree”. They can feel, smell, and get to know the tree. They are then brought to the starting point. Take off blindfold and see if you can find your tree again.
# Listening game- close eyes and see how many sounds you can hear
# Nature bingo
# Alphabet nature hunt
# Memory game: collect objects, place on table, have them look then take away and see if can recreate what went where on the table
# Card games: Old Maid, Go Fish, Cribbage, War, Poker
# Make your own puzzles and printables
* Color walk
* Sound Walk
* Flashlight hike
* Tracks search- especially fun in fresh snow
* Scavenger hunts
Also Teach about respect for nature and how to be safe.

Have age appropriate discussions with your children before you go and throughout your trip.

* Talk before you go about what behavior is acceptable in nature and what behavior is not okay. Talk about the importance of staying on trails both for their safety and for the safety of the wildlife. Discuss how far they will be allowed to explore around the campground itself.
* Teach them how to use a compass and a map.
* Make sure they know what plants to avoid look like such as poison ivy, poison oak and stinging nettles. Talk about what to do if come into contact with them. Bring along anti itch medicine and anti poison ivy/oak washes.
* Talk about fire safety and what kind of behavior is acceptable around the fire. Talk about whether or not they will be involved in helping to build and/or stoke the fire. Kids love fire and love to be involved. Help to avoid a meltdown by discussing beforehand how much they will be allowed to be involved with adding wood to the fire.
* Discuss how to avoid and what to do if come across a dangerous animal like a bear , mountain lion or rattlesnake .
* Teach basic first aid. Show them where the first aid kit is and how to use it (if age appropriate).
* Teach kids how to look for ticks.
* Teach them how to pay attention to where they are going when exploring. As you are walking around teach about landmarks, positions of the sun, where water is heard etc. Show them where you are on a map. Talk them through how you pay attention to your surroundings.
* Teach your children what to do if lost- hug a tree.
* Take a digital picture of your child at the beginning of your trip or each day so that you have a recent photo to show authorities if needed
* Give every child a whistle. It is easier to hear at a distance than a child’s voice

Make clear rules

* Before you go discuss what will happen and what is expected of them
* When get to camp make clear where the boundaries are and where and when they are allowed to explore. I love the idea of making glow in the dark rocks seen here and originally blogged here to mark the campsite boundaries. Be sure to make them at home and take them home with you. Or bring string to mark a trail or circle that kids are allowed to be within.
* Teach about the rules of campsites- noise level, dog ettiquette etc.
* Teach about No Trace Camping
Most important:

Be with your kids. Be present. Leave behind your cell phone and computer. Immerse yourself in the moment and in their excitement. Be enthusiastic. Make the memories for you and your kids. This is that time you are going to look back on and smile!
Kathleen Hines said:
Also Teach about respect for nature and how to be safe.

Have age appropriate discussions with your children before you go and throughout your trip.

* Talk before you go about what behavior is acceptable in nature and what behavior is not okay. Talk about the importance of staying on trails both for their safety and for the safety of the wildlife. Discuss how far they will be allowed to explore around the campground itself.
* Teach them how to use a compass and a map.
* Make sure they know what plants to avoid look like such as poison ivy, poison oak and stinging nettles. Talk about what to do if come into contact with them. Bring along anti itch medicine and anti poison ivy/oak washes.
* Talk about fire safety and what kind of behavior is acceptable around the fire. Talk about whether or not they will be involved in helping to build and/or stoke the fire. Kids love fire and love to be involved. Help to avoid a meltdown by discussing beforehand how much they will be allowed to be involved with adding wood to the fire.
* Discuss how to avoid and what to do if come across a dangerous animal like a bear , mountain lion or rattlesnake .
* Teach basic first aid. Show them where the first aid kit is and how to use it (if age appropriate).
* Teach kids how to look for ticks.
* Teach them how to pay attention to where they are going when exploring. As you are walking around teach about landmarks, positions of the sun, where water is heard etc. Show them where you are on a map. Talk them through how you pay attention to your surroundings.
* Teach your children what to do if lost- hug a tree.
* Take a digital picture of your child at the beginning of your trip or each day so that you have a recent photo to show authorities if needed
* Give every child a whistle. It is easier to hear at a distance than a child’s voice

Make clear rules

* Before you go discuss what will happen and what is expected of them
* When get to camp make clear where the boundaries are and where and when they are allowed to explore. I love the idea of making glow in the dark rocks seen here and originally blogged here to mark the campsite boundaries. Be sure to make them at home and take them home with you. Or bring string to mark a trail or circle that kids are allowed to be within.
* Teach about the rules of campsites- noise level, dog ettiquette etc.
* Teach about No Trace Camping
Most important:

Be with your kids. Be present. Leave behind your cell phone and computer. Immerse yourself in the moment and in their excitement. Be enthusiastic. Make the memories for you and your kids. This is that time you are going to look back on and smile!
This might seem silly, and it's not exactly a thing to do, but I am dead serious about it: I think it helps if the bus has a name. Kids are far more likely to be sympathetic to an object that is named. I know that it has helped Esmé ('08 Human) feel attached to Ludwig ('74 Westy); rather than thinking of the camper as a thing whose faults (noisy, hot in Summer, cold in Winter, not as comfortable a bed, long stretches of just sitting, etc.) are something to be barely tolerated, she looks forward to hanging out with/in one of her friends. This likely will only work if the kid is started pretty young, I suspect.
(Hint: when the thing is giving you fits, it'll help you too.)
Just a thought.
I thought all buses had names:)

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